;

Archive for March 2009 | Monthly archive page

Mar 30

Co-presented with Film Arts Foundation For this winter season kick-off we open the doors wide at Cinematheque’s Ninth Street home for a free evening of new local film, video, installation and music. In the back space: new works by Sow Yee Au (the performed Tristes Tropiques), Rick Bahto (The Soft Things), Elizabeth Block (Strewnpackedcinderwhateverlight), Robert

-> Read more

Mar 30

co-presented by Cinematheque Songs of sorrow meandering under the deserted land; whispers and stories unleashed from the throat of the mute keepers of secrets. The hibernated truth lies within. Garden of wonders aroused. Titles: Target Practice by Caroline Key [Winner of Monaco Labs services award $600 for Achievement in Narrative/Fiction]; Dead People by Roger Deutsch

-> Read more

Mar 30

co-presented by Cinematheque Traces of the recollected, traces of time, sculpting the beauty of the ordinary. Titles: Marathon by Jefferson Pinder; Watch by Robert Todd [Jurors’ Citation]; Lower Case “w” Wife by Marina Potok [Jurors’ Citation]; Observations at Gettysburg by Brian Frye [Jurors’ Citation]; Flora’s Film by Michael Wilson; Aerial Elegy by Michael Wilson; Danzante

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-presented by Cinematheque A world of delicacies, of the unseen faces, of the intimate dance around the prospered heart. It’s all through the looking glass. Titles: Skirr by Rachel Clarke and Stephen Blumberg [Jurors’ Citation]; Poor White Trash Girl – Class Consciousness by Kelley Spivey; Orange by Gregg Biermann; Fragment Film by Aurelio Kopainig; Lunch

-> Read more

Mar 30

These two documents of vast scope and rich detail are descendents of Walter Ruttman’s 1927 Berlin: Symphony of a City, a seminal film of the organic, teeming urban day. Times have changed. The city has sprawled and beneath the human din you can hear a monotonous hum of electromechanical remote security. The Giant (1983) is

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-presented by Cinematheque For our East Coast friends A cinema based on touch, gestures of contact between the surface of film and the world, is the basis of tonight’s screening. Emulsive transformations, both human and the earth’s, palimpsests of paint and scratchings, or traces left by light and life transform the site of film into

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-presented by Cinematheque Flowing of light, a gentle breeze, a thunderstorm or a hypnotized face gazing into the weeping and smiling world. A valentine for the crystallized heart. Kristy by Stephanie Gray Snow Flow by Caroline Savage [Festival Award for Achievement in Alternative Processing] Oil Derric by Robbie Land Photograpm Blue and Red by Karen

-> Read more

Mar 30

Gregg Biermann’s feature-length digital video Material Excess uses supermarket coupons, catalogs, flyers and advertising inserts to pierce through the glossy surface of all manner of printed matter and find a frenetic and visceral currency of cultural excess. Borrowing its three-part structure from Dante’s The Divine Comedy (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise), the mesmerizing pastiche of Material

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-presented by Cinematheque Festival continues through Sunday, February 22 The Armenian Film Festival includes films and videos with Armenian themes from filmmakers in Armenia and throughout the worldwide diaspora. The unique, topical works in this festival range from narrative to experimental, documentary to fiction, features to shorts, all made by filmmakers in the Middle East,

-> Read more

Mar 30

It can be said that Cornell made two kinds of films in two distinct periods of activity: collage films, made by recombining found materials; and directed films, on which he worked with cinematographers (including Stan Brakhage, Rudy Burckhardt and Larry Jordan) to document his fantasies and experiences of wandering in New York. Though rarely exhibited

-> Read more

Mar 30

This program of restored early films from Cornell’s unique private collection provides insight into the sources, materials, inspirations and obsessions of the artist. It includes fantasy trickfilms, nickleodeon shorts, early animations and classic Méliès that Cornell selected for a film soiree in 1949 at A New Art School, New York City. Among the films: A

-> Read more

Mar 30

Visual magician Zoe Beloff joins us from New York with Lost, Shadow Land and a sneak preview of her installation The Ideoplastic Materializations of Eva C. Beloff wants to “reanimate the great nineteenth century visual forms that have been discarded-the ghost show, the séances, the stereo-view, the diorama and the phantasmagoria-to create new cinematic languages

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-presented with Goethe-Insitut San Francisco These pieces by radical German film essayist Harun Farocki explore the complex and shifting relationships between violence, visibility and technology in the context of war. Produced at the height of Vietnam, Inextinguishable Fire (1969) presents a Brechtian analysis of the production and use of napalm, corporate involvement in the technology

-> Read more

Mar 30

San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival co-presented by Cinematheque South Korean writer-director Gina Kim is mastering the art of baring one’s soul in front of the camera. In her debut narrative feature Invisible Light, lingering, meticulously framed shots expose the turbulent and varying emotions of inner struggle and psychological extremes. Choi Yoon Sun and

-> Read more

Mar 30

Presented in cooperation with Other Minds The Harry Partch Foundation has given us a very rare opportunity to see the original 16mm film of maverick composer Harry Partch’s most accomplished masterpiece. Delusion of the Fury: A Ritual Dream and Delusion enacts two interlocking fables, one Japanese and one African. It was written for six actors,

-> Read more

Mar 30

One of the central figures of the avant-garde film movement that emerged in the Bay Area in the 1960s, Swedish native Gunvor Nelson returns to San Francisco for a much-anticipated screening of recent and older work. Known for her exquisite compositions, painterly activation of the film’s surface, and playful blending of physical and cinematic space,

-> Read more

Mar 30

Claire Bain and Al Hernandez have performed in their own and in each others’ work for over a decade, simultaneously constructing and deconstructing various personae for the camera. Taking the subject/object politics of photographic representation into their own hands, their multiple characters play to the camera or to each other. Sometimes studied, sometimes ad-libbed, they

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-presented with San Francisco Jewish Film Festival We’re excited to present a SNEAK PREVIEW of Barbara Hammer’s new film, Resisting Paradise, a provocative experimental documentary that leads viewers on a participatory journey of discovery through very timely questions: What are our responsibilities during political crises? How does art exist during a time of war? The

-> Read more

Mar 30

Sponsored by the Consulate General of Spain, San Francisco “Understanding cinema as kynema, motion, and understating that image is not a visual prerogative, blind films hitch perceptible sources in a homemade animated theatre place.” So writes Basque composer, improvisor and instrument builder Alex Mendizabal, who will visit tonight for a rare presentation of his mysterious

-> Read more

Mar 30

The first of our Matta-Clark programs focuses on early, performative works for which the artist climbed tall trees and hung precariously from nets (Tree Dance), set fire to urban detritus in Brooklyn (Fire Child) and surrendered his beloved truck, Herman Meydag, to the gleeful clang and wreckage of bulldozers (Fresh Kill). Provocative, playful and physically

-> Read more

Mar 30

Five more films that delve deep into Matta-Clark’s obsession with buildings, gaps, cuts, slices…and fish? Indeed, while challenging himself with increasingly ambitious deconstructions both in the U.S and Europe, Matta-Clark donned a chef’s hat and opened Food, which became a popular greasy spoon in downtown Manhattan. The informally observational Food hungers for the possibility of

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-Presented with Film Arts Foundation Writer, composer, theorist and filmmaker Trinh Minh-ha consistently challenges her audiences with each new work, constantly shifting the ways in which she critically engages with the form and spirit of cinema. Long celebrated for her essay films that transform viewers through their exquisitely articulated deconstruction of our cinematic expectations (Reassemblage,

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-presented with Headlands Center for the Arts’ Artist Talks Since the early 90s the world’s first microCINEMA, San Francisco’s Total Mobile Home (TMH)-Rebecca Barten and David Sherman-have periodically procured armloads of deserted institutional films from trashcans behinds Bay Area libraries, schools and labs. Says TMH: “It is a strange, sad and beautiful thing to find

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-Presented with the San Francisco International Film Festival and the Pacific Film Archive Incorporating keenly wrought observations, plundered educational films, hand-drawn animation, decaying celluloid or an eclectic array of optical techniques, the ten films in our annual co-presentation of recent experimental work bring to light concealed realities and unspoken emotions. Charlotte Pryce’s Concerning Flight: Five

-> Read more

Mar 30

Co-Presented with the San Francisco International Film Festival This international selection of experimental shorts features manipulations of appropriated footage, creations of alternate parallel worlds and meditations on the meaning of family. Films include It’s Not My Memory of It: Three Recollected Documents (Julia Meltzer & David Thorne) An investigation of secrecy, memory and classified documents;

-> Read more

Mar 30

Historical panoramas were invented because people wanted to see many times and spaces at once, while cinema has from its inception also been a means to envision a more expansive and more detailed reality. Muybridge’s motion studies, PainlevÈ’s seahorses, and Brakhage’s sea of nameless greens all realize Vertov’s KINO EYE, extending human perception. The science

-> Read more

Mar 30

What if film is not necessarily a simulacrum of reality but a way of perceiving the space we inhabit? Our lives are spent on the split-level between the forms of architecture and movements of city planning: the inside of the city versus the outside of the city. Tonight’s program is a curatorial experiment in reading

-> Read more

Mar 30

“[P]hotographs remind us that landscape is not an act of fate but of human choice, and seem to ask, “What would you like this landscape to become, bearing in mind what it was and what it is?” (Philippe Arbaözar) The works in this program focus on re-presenting the ‘natural’ landscape as a site of information

-> Read more

Mar 30

In celebration of Tuumba Press’ recent publication of Nathaniel Dorsky’s new book Devotional Cinema (described by Kathleen Tyner as “a rare treasure of penetrating insight into the language of film… somewhere between a Zen koan and a Victorian love story”), the Cinematheque presents A Child’s Garden and the Serious Sea, the 1991 masterwork by Stan

-> Read more

Mar 25

Co-Presented with NAATA Nguyen Tan Hoang kicks off Dialogues in the Dark: The Pleasures and Anxieties of Influence, a new series for which contemporary media provocateurs pair their own works with those of their avant-garde forebears. Vietnamese-American Hoang makes videos that raucously and provocatively subvert both pop culture and identity politics while simultaneously interrogating forms

-> Read more

Mar 25

Co-presented with Film Arts Foundation Ross Lipman premieres The Interview, a taut psychological narrative exquisitely rendered in muted colors and with a soundtrack worthy of comparison to Bresson’s best. Shot during Lipman’s years in San Francisco, it concerns a woman trying to pick up the trail of her past, by chance and through goodwill entering

-> Read more

Mar 25

Many of Janie Geiser’s films are like cinematic miniatures, evoking ambiguous narratives and cryptic worlds filled with primal yet elusive emotion. Through her delicate and deft animation of found objects, cut-out images and enigmatic female figures, she creates tiny dramas with immense resonance, often drawing from a ‘noir’ sensibility of anxiety and suspense. Tonight we

-> Read more

Mar 25

Since the late ’60s, Morgan Fisher has made films which foreground the industrial basis of all filmmaking, ironically combining narrative and non-narrative forms and underscoring the common ground between the oft-unreconciled poles of the independently produced “experimental” film and industrially produced commercial product. In his first visit since 1985, Fisher (who has long worked in

-> Read more

Mar 25

For more than twenty years, media archeologist Rick Prelinger has been investigating and interpreting ephemeral media forms, most famously educational and industrial film. Projects such as Our Secret Century, Call It Home and the Ephemeral Films series use this material as a means to expose twentieth-century trends such as the growth of the American middle

-> Read more

Mar 25

Former San Francisco resident Jennifer Fieber returns from New York for her first in-person screening, along with Cinematheque staffer, filmmaker and audio artist Steve Polta. The luminous landscapes and abstracted urban structures of Fieber’s films resonate with a disquieting tranquility, while Polta transposes his rhythmic and sometimes rancorous audio syncopations with sensuous renderings of micro-landscapes.

-> Read more

Mar 25

Sponsored by the Consulate General of Spain, San Francisco Known throughout Europe for his wildly gestural, vibrantly colored abstract paintings, Basque artist José Antonio Sistiaga treats color and light as raw materials and sole subject matter in his large scale immersive canvasses, expressing a vigorous and confrontational attitude towards free and direct sensual experience. While

-> Read more

Mar 25

Jean Rouch made hundreds of films, initiated a collaborative form of ethnographic cinema, was seminal for the French New Wave and coined the term cinéma vérité with Edgar Morin in Chronicle of a Summer. He died in a car accident in Niger this year at the age of 86. As a tribute to his crucial

-> Read more

Mar 25

Star Spangled to Death (1957/59-2003, 16mm film transferred to video) is Ken Jacobs’ legendary and monumental paean to the pratfalls of patriotism and the mind-numbing consequences of conventional wisdom. Found materials as diverse as Nixon’s “Checkers” speech, a Warner Brothers short publicizing the NRA, a neo-colonialist documentary about white explorers among African “savages,” cartoons, scientific

-> Read more

Mar 25

Co-presented with MadCat Women’s International Film Festival Both humorous and chilling, these performance art pieces were created some of the most fearless and innovative women artists. Watch Yoko Ono try to extricate herself from the confines of her underclothes in Freedom. Ono puts her trust in the audience as she sits and allows them to

-> Read more

Mar 25

Co-presented with Film Arts Foundation Long a pioneer of personal filmmaking, for nearly four decades Jon Jost has produced a diverse and powerful body of works recognized for their formal beauty and narrative innovation as well as astute and scathing political critiques. Since the mid-90s, Jost has been a controversial advocate for digital cinema, producing

-> Read more

Mar 25

Using both found footage and her own camerawork, New York/Dublin artist Julie Murray’s films apply artful editing and inventive juxtapositions to make images come alive with new and often startling possibilities. As part of our ongoing “Dialogues in the Dark” series, Murray returns to San Francisco to present new and older work in 16mm and

-> Read more

Mar 25

Boston-based Acadian French-Canadian filmmaker Louise Bourque creates intensely personal and beautifully handcrafted films. Mostly under five minutes long and made with unorthodox techniques (including hand-processing), each seems to burst forth from a complex emotional experience, often stemming from childhood, into the light and onto the screen. Bourque will screen her Jours en fleurs, Self Portrait

-> Read more

Mar 25

Co-presented by Artists’ Television Access A constellation of analogue/digital explorers unlock inter-media light patterns. The fusion of works take on a “between space” through literal, metaphorical or un-metaphorical screenings/writings/performances: Muses of Cinema by Kerry Laitala; Scott Stark’s Chromosthetic Response and The Sound of his Face; Rick Danielson’s 153 Simultaneous Exposures of Me; live video scrubbing

-> Read more

Mar 25

From San Francisco to Boston, Gibbons practices his brand of subversive cinema mischief. Working in a quasi-diaristic genre for more than thirty years, he leverages his own neuroses to mock and critique the norms of our consumer- and work-driven society. We screen his early Super-8 Spying, an “exercise in applied voyeurism,” shot in San Francisco,

-> Read more

Mar 25

Sex Underground features an eclectic and rarely-screened assortment of four decades of Japanese film (single and multiple projection), video, and animation exploring sexuality, power, gender and the body. Utilizing theatrical traditions and a powerful performative agency, film and video makers such as Ito Takashi, Nakajima Takashi, Donald Richie, Terayama Shuji and Imaizumi Koichi subvert and

-> Read more

Mar 25

One of Japan’s foremost documentarians, Tsuchimoto Noriaki has dedicated much of his career to exploring the consequences of environmental disaster, especially those associated with Minamata disease, the result of mercury dumping in southwest Japan’s stunningly beautiful Shiranui Sea. Over 35 years, Tsuchimoto made a number of films with and about the people of Minamata, films

-> Read more

Mar 25

Co-presented with Film Arts Foundation In this special pre-election show, an anonymous home movie from New Jersey in 1938 reports on an American Nazi rally. From postwar Germany, an Army film written by Dr. Seuss warns troops against fraternizing with the enemy. Bruce Baillie’s San Francisco of 1963 is the site of A Hurrah for

-> Read more

Mar 25

Co-presented with Roxie Cinema ands California College of the Arts Remote Control Voting: Antonio Muntadas and Marshall Reese’s Political Advertisement 2004 2,4 and 6 pm Like Bruce Springsteen in “57 Channels and Nothing On,” we channel-surf pointlessly. Then, just between Olympic diving and Pimp My Ride, we stop on a talking head in a blue

-> Read more

Mar 25

Co-presented with the CCA Graduate Studies and CCA Wattis Institute Fall 2004 Public Lecture Series Media activist, author and co-founder of Paper Tiger Television and Deep Dish Satellite Network, Dee Dee Halleck has worked for more than forty years at the forefront of the movement for democratic use of communication technology. Combining a DIY aesthetic

-> Read more

Mar 25

Co-presented with the Castro Theatre From the primal intimacy of the womb to the universal wonderment of the great beyond, British filmmaker Simon Pummell takes us on a kaleidoscopic lifecycle journey in Bodysong, his highly acclaimed documentary consisting entirely of stunning archival footage. Recalling Koyaanisqatsi and Baraka in its visual sweep and lack of conventional

-> Read more