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Archive for July 2009 | Monthly archive page

Jul 30

Former New York Times and Rolling Stone journalist Michael Benson’s Predictions of Fire focuses on the controversial rock group Laibach, the most successful East European pop cultural export of the 80’s and 90’s. Benson’s multi-layered film encompasses the history of European totalitarianism with special emphasis placed on the role of art. “If the idea of

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Jul 27

Daniel Eisenberg’s Persistence (1997, 86 min.), which premiered at the 1997 Berlin Film Festival, is the final film in a trilogy that includes Displaced Person (1981) and Cooperation of Parts (1987). Shot in Berlin during the German Unification (1991-92), Persistence documents the change in landscape that accompanies historical rupture, and the ways in which the

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Jul 27

Rudy Burckhardt has been passionately making films since 1937. “A subterranean monument,” as John Ashbery has called him, his body of cinema is remarkable not only for its longevity but for its quality, range and unpretentious accessibility. A noted still photographer, Burckhardt’s first films were street portraits of great purity of vision. Burckhardt also continued

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Jul 27

A series of live events featuring artists experimenting with presentations of film, video, and still imagery. Featured works will include projection art utilizing unique projection devices, alternative image processing, sound, and performance. All events will take place at The LAB, a non profit alternative art space dedicated to the presentation of interdisciplinary and experimental art.

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Jul 27

In Jay Rosenblatt’s Human Remains(1997) the filmmaker, “like an archaeologist, sifts through remains and uncovers intimate details of five infamous men. There is no mention of their public lives or of their place in history–they are presented as people. Their personalities and psychological make-up are revealed only through details they share. The intent is not

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Jul 27

The Cinematheque and Film Arts Foundation co-present two programs as part of this year’s Film Arts Festival. Saturday, Nov, 8 at 11:00am, Open Screen–Films and videos under 15 minutes (35mm, 16mm, & 3/4″ only) screened on a first-come basis; the first 70 minutes submitted to FAF’s office starting 9:00am Friday, October 24 will be shown.

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Jul 27

Several years ago Viennese filmmaker Gustav Deutsch was given a pocket viewer as a present. In this micro-viewer was an 8mm sex film loop depicting an eternal copulation. Deutsch bought more viewers in a Hamburg sex shop and prepared his own films for an imagined mini-cinema. Tonight’s Pocket Cinema ‘screening’ provides pocket viewers for one

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Jul 27

Among the founders of Bay Area experimental cinema, Will Hindle (1930-1987) created films of rare lucidity, mystery and emotion, yet today he is often overlooked. Hindle’s elemental weave of lyricism, documentary and narrative, combined with a primal command of sound/image, delivers and demands an overwhelming empathy for his subjects–both on screen and before it. Tonight’s

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Jul 27

Barbara Hammer returns with an evening of rare early work for expanded cinema and video which will give a fuller sense of her work’s range for those who know her most recent films. “In the mid-1970’s I was concerned with the passivity of audiences during film screenings. I was also interested in the manner in

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Jul 27

Join us at 30 Berry Street for a party toasting the No Nothing Cinema, which has added its distinctive flair to Bay Area cultural life for fifteen years. Filmmakers who would like to participate in a screening reflecting life in San Francisco should send films to the Cinematheque office by Friday, October 17. All films

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Jul 27

A program of new films dealing with notions of reverberating images and sounds, as revealing repetitions, subtle variations of captured gestures, or as unexpected schism. Matthias Mueller’s Pensao Globo portrays a man who faces his approaching death, following his last journey which ends in Lisbon; Julie Murray’s If you stand with your back to the

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Jul 27

Moving between animated discussions among diverse groups of women, a wry barbie lesbian fashion show, the poetic recitation of childhood memories, and culinary performance art ‘written on the body’, We Can’t All Have Come From That Island In Greece (Bay Area premiere) turns any notion of a homogeneous lesbian community sideways. Being out, passing, ‘gender

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Jul 27

Co-sponsored The Speros Basil Vryonis Center for the Study of Hellenism Organized by Temenos, Inc. The Cinematheque and Pacific Film Archive provide the long-awaited opportunity for Bay Area audiences to see the films of pioneering Greek-American filmmaker Gregory J. Markopoulos (1928-1992). A contemporary of Anger, Brakhage and J. Smith, he has been described by P.

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Jul 23

This first of two programs devoted to mostly new films and videos features work which combines often disparate footage (autobiographical, observational, theoretical) which is tied together through reflections on the material and subsequent life experience. Peggy Ahwesh’s the vision machine “…is a knockout…an inspired depiction of girls dressing up and acting out, pleased as punch

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Jul 23

Vanguard Filmmaker, radical photographer, seminal performance artist, Queer saint: Jack Smith (Flaming Creatures) was one of New York’s most influential underground artists from the late 50’s until his death from AIDS in 1989. Smith explored and developed a deceptively absurd camp aesthetic, importing allusions to B-Grade Hollywood films and elements of social and political satire

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Jul 23

The 1997 ResFest Digital Film Festival comes to the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco on Sept 25 – 27 with two programs of films, panel discussions and numerous interactive demonstraions. This internationally touring festival focuses on the expanding field of digital filmmaking, particularly the increasingly powerful desktop computer. The two programs are the

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Jul 23

Hong Kong movie stars, beauty queens and strange uncles are some of the inhabitants of San Francisco Valerie Soe’s personal explorations of Asian American life and culture. The program will feature Valerie’s new, Beyond Asiaphilia, which is an homage to miscegenation, lust, and Hong Kong movies. The evening will also include several of Valerie’s earlier

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Jul 23

Blackbird Descending (Tense Alignment) (1977) & After Lumiere–L’Arroseur Arrosé (1974). Le Grice is author of Abstract Film and Beyond and was principal theorist of the the English Materialist film movement of the 1970’s. “Like poet Wallace Stevens, Le Grice gives us thirteen ways of looking at a blackbird with fresh eyes.” (Ken Wlaschin)

Jul 23

White Heart (1975) & Popular Songs (1979). White Heart “introduces a new type of structuring in film…The film is like a series of sores, sometimes healed over, sometimes left exposed; sometimes humorous, like a scraped knee, and sometimes shattering, like a broken and disassembled brain.” (DB)

Jul 23

La Raison Avant La Passion (1968-69) & Hand Tinting (1967). “La Raison…is Joyce Wieland’s major film so far” (P. Adams Sitney), an ode to and critique of Canada as seen through a cross-country trip. La Raisonn is “…about the pain and joy of living in a very large space: in fact, in a continent.” (Hollis

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Jul 23

Mouches Volantes (Elective Affinities II) (1976) & Barn Rushes (1971). “Gottheim’s cinema is a quest of origins. The films elaborate a response to the fictions of our world, the construction of images and sounds, the repeating cycles of life and nature.” (John Hanhardt.) Mouches Volantes is the second part of a four-film series.

Jul 23

A fascinating combination of two artistic visions, Brownsnow is an expressionistic documentary on Michael Snow (Wavelength, La Region Centrale), one of the seminal figures of North American avant-garde film as well as internationally recognized sculptor, painter, photographer and musician. The film is a melding of Canadian filmmaker and photographer Carl Brown’s rich manipulation of the

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Jul 23

Mekas, “raving maniac of the cinema”, filmmaker, advocate, and founder of New York’s Anthology Film Archive, creates his own history of cinema in this impressionistic encyclopedia of 160 portraits of independent fimmakers and film activists shot between 1955 and 1996. This journey across the memory of film includes encounters with Langlois, Rossellini, Frank, Ana Karina,

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Jul 23

When Buñuel was fired from his job supervising the Spanish versions of Warner Bros. films in 1946, he left Hollywood for Mexico, where he began a fruitful phase of his career, making 21 films from 1946 to 1965. In A Mexican Buñuel, Emilio Maillé finds many of Buñuel’s friends and collaborators during this remarkable period

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Jul 23

In the Land of Cinema Veterans: A Film Expedition around Dziga Vertov is a combination travelogue/documentary portrait of this great master of Soviet cinema who left an indelible mark on film history with his passionate revolutionary manifestos and films such as Man With a Movie Camera and Enthusiasm. Thomas Tode and Ale Muñoz use their

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Jul 23

Presented in Association with Canyon Cinema A screening of recently acquired films from the overflowing shelves of Canyon Cinema, the country’s premier distributor of independent (REALLY independent) and experimental film. This tribute to Canyon Cinema features short experimental films including: two films in glorious 35 mm – Suzanne Pitt’s 24 minute animated narrative Joy Street,

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Jul 23

Through the years, Hoffman’s films have built upon a dialogue of personal history and memory. His films bring together formal strategies that encompass both the conceptual and the accidental. Somewhere Between Jalostotitlan and Encarnacion (1984), passing through/torn formations (1988), ?O,Zoo! (The Making of a Fiction Film) (1986), and river (1979-89) negotiate this developing sense of

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Jul 23

Canadian filmmaker Philip Hoffman has been making films for the past twenty-five years. He has been engaged in the education and inspiration of many young filmmakers through his courses at Sheridan College, York University and his artisinal film workshops at his rural Ontario farm. Hoffman’s films have been described as ‘experimental diarist cinema’, an intimate

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Jul 13

41st San Francisco International Film Festival (See Friday May 1 for Series Overview) Documents and More: Liferaft Earth (1969); This Song for Jack (1983); Hunter (1989)

Jul 13

41st San Francisco International Film Festival (See Friday May 1 for Series Overview) Pull My Daisy (1959); OK End Here (1963); Keep Busy (1975)

Jul 13

41st San Francisco International Film Festival This year the Cinematheque’s co-presentations with the 41st San Francisco International Film Festival include a six-part retrospective of the work of Robert Frank as well as a program of experimental work, following last year’s successful ‘Phantom Cinema’. Complete information about the programs, including dates and showtimes, will be available

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Jul 13

Hernandez and Rosenthal’s Super 8mm works navigate, penetrate, and celebrate a lyrical and fractured interplay of natural, urban, and emulsive worlds. Al’s films–Jump Fence, in which a suburban backyard becomes a dreamscape for the genesis of a new self, That Mission Rising, and Good Medicine–are surreal explorations into personal and planetary identity conveyed through dramatic

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Jul 13

Essay, documentary and feature filmmaker Raoul Peck is now the Culture Minister of Haiti. A Haitian who grew up in Zaire during the tumultuous years of African independence, studied filmmaking in Brussels, and now lives in Haiti, Peck is a unique voice in the cinema of the African diaspora. Using archival footage, home movies, and

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Jul 13

The restoration of Andy Warhol’s films is finally recommencing, and tonight’s program includes two never before shown on the West Coast: Screen Test #2 (1965, 66 minutes) was one of Warhol’s earliest sound films and preceded such gems as Poor Little Rich Girl and Vinyl; it stars Ronald Tavel and Mario Montez. Restaurant (1965, 33

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Jul 13

Postmodern Super 8 is to women, as S8 was to the 70s. In tonight’s program, a detour from posh 90s filmmaking, the ‘splicing circle’ discourse is on uninhibited sexuality (male dominated in the past with Super 8 porn and home movies). The dialogue of female hand to trigger is always evident: these women have stopped

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Jul 09

János Sugár ‘s conceptual and avant-garde work spans the range of performance art, installation, opera, film and video. Since 1984 he has been exhibiting work in both national and international showcases, and he recently completed an Artlink Residency at the Cleveland Institute of Art. Between 1990 and 1995, he served as a board member of

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Jul 09

Eric Saks’ newest work Creosote combines the true story of a young boy lost on a Boy Scout camping trip and the life of St. Francis, the 13th century ‘hippie saint’, to create a unique vision of individuality and modern spirituality. Told through meditative voice-overs and Retablo-like intertitles, Creosote presents a visceral religious experience with

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Jul 09

Presented in Conjunction with the Exhibit California Suite: New Art from LA in the Walter/McBean Gallery of the San Francisco Art Institute in the Walter/McBean Gallery of the San Francisco Art Institute Film artists in Los Angeles are buried but not yet dead. There’s not much of a film community between Hollywood and the galleries,

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Jul 09

Paul Godard is a tv producer; Denise, his lover, wants to leave him; and Isabelle (Huppert) is a self-possessed prostitute who crosses paths with each of them. Considered one of Godard’s more accessible films, Sauve Qui Peut (La Vie)–translated into English as Every Man for Himself–is an engrossing elliptical narrative with a complex subtext on

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Jul 09

This historical survey of short films examines the complex ways in which we humans relate to our fellow animals, whether as taxidermed artifact, laboratory specimen, zoological wonder, meat, fable, or beloved pet. Films include: Elephant Electrocution (1903) by Thomas Edison; The Voice of the Nightingale by Ladislas Starevich (1923); A Summer Saga by Arne Sucksdorff

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Jul 09

Gary Adelstein and Jerry Orr have been making personal/experimental films since the early 1970s. In 1975, along with Jerry Tartaglia they co-founded Berks Filmmakers Inc., which is still functioning today as a showcase for experimental film and video. Both artists have worked extensively in Super 8 film. Orr often utilized rephotography and Adelstein the JK

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Jul 09

The Middle of the World is one of several screen collaborations between Swiss filmmaker Alain Tanner (Jonas Will be 25 in the Year Two Thousand, In the White City) and English critic, novelist and poet John Berger (Ways of Seeing, Pig Earth). Tracing the trajectory of a love affair between a Swiss politician and an

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Jul 09

Lynn Sachs’ A Biography of Lilith interweaves mystical texts with interviews and poetry to update the creation myth in this story of the first woman and for some, the first feminist. Lilith’s betrayal and vow of revenge is recast as a modern tale with present-day Lilith musing on a life that has included giving up

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Jul 09

Presented in Association with the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival From the raw-edged to the poetic, a program of experimental shorts by Asian American film and video artists. Reworking home movies, found footage, Super 8, hand-processing, multimedia and the kitchen sink, these pieces run the gamut from intimate personal essays to astute social

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Jul 09

Steve Fagin’s video work has been featured at a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and is the focal point of a recent book, Talkin’ With Your Mouth Full: Conversations with the Videos of Steve Fagin. His new feature TropiCola was shot in Havana and San Francisco using Cuba’s finest actors

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Jul 09

Christine Tamblyn, a conceptual and new media artist and influential teacher at San Francisco State from 1986-1994, passed away on New Year’s Day of breast cancer. Her life was her artistic medium in performance, writing and electronic media. This tribute explores her life/art, drawing on her interactive series on women: I Love It, I Love

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Jul 09

Potluck at intermission, BRING FOOD!, drinks provided. Austrian filmmaker Kurt Kren is one of the most influential pioneers of structuralist cinema, crafting films on the basis of the formal structures of sound and image. His work stretches across many fields–from the mathematics of scoring films with numbers and charts, to the grimy documentation of Otto

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Jul 09

Boston videomaker Elisabeth Subrin joins us with a premiere of her new Shulie, a critical remake of a little known 1967 documentary portrait of a young Chicago art student who a few years later would become a notable figure in Second Wave feminism and author of the radical 1970 manifesto The Dialectic of Sex. The

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Jul 09

Come celebrate the most comprehensive exhibition/survey of 8mm film and video ever assembled (curated by Steve Anker and Jytte Jensen of NY MoMA), which runs at The Museum of Modern Art in New York from February 1998 through December 1999. Our screening includes work by some of the Bay Area’s most accomplished small gauge artists:

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Jul 09

Art writer Lucy Lippard has said: “Joyce Wieland is one of those wild cards that saves the contemporary art world from its straight and narrow conformity to an institutionalized ‘wildness.’” Her work spans a full range of media–including painting, drawing, print, assemblage, quilts, sculpture, experimental and feature film, and public art–and explores feminism, nationalism, ecology

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