Archive for November 2009 | Monthly archive page

Nov 30

What happens when the newest “avant-garde” cultural producers have been raised on MTV music videos, infomercials, slasher films, CD Roms, video games, and other latch-key entertainment forms? They re-consume them, and spit them back out at you. This program features work that uses popular entertainment formats-like the music video, CD Rom, the situation comedy-to illustrate

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Nov 30

Andrew Noren’s “The Adventures of the Exquisite Corpse” is an ongoing series of films which explore the magical activity of light as reflected through familiar objects and the filmmaker’s personal landscape. Part V, The Lighted Field (1987, 61 min.) is more of a narrative puzzle than the others, seamlessly incorporating pre-existing and recorded material into

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Nov 30

Richard Myers has been developing his unique world of dream-films since 1960, films which use meticulous craft to envelop the viewer in subtle but startling dislocations of logic, time and space. Moving Pictures (1990, 100 min.) is an award-winning feature “built upon a single, continuous horizontal movement of the camera–a relentless right to left tracking

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Nov 30

For those of you who missed Pandaemonium (by Leslie Asako Gladsjo and Richard Curson Smith, 1995) at the last Film Arts Festival, here’s another chance to see this spectacular documentary about artists exploring and exploding the boundary between human body and machine: San Francisco’s own Survival Research Laboratories, David Theirren and his ‘machines for the

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Nov 30

New York filmmaker Abigail Child returns to the Cinematheque with her first major work since the completion of her 7-part “Is This What You Were Born For?” in 1989. Applying rhythmic construction, poetic license and a generous eye to bodies in poverty, B/Side (1996, 40 min.) documents poignantly and beautifully a gritty vision of late

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Nov 30

Herzog’s 1971 Land of Silence and Darkness takes us into the extraordinary world of the deaf-blind and is possibly the most mystical of the documentaries made by a director famous for his voyages into the agonies and ecstasies that usually bypass the lives of ordinary people. Focusing on the 56 year old Fini Straubinger who

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Nov 30

Co-Sponsored by New Langton Arts “Shadow Land” was conceived to accompany New Langton Arts’ exhibition “Real World”, a group of installations by young artists which open new perceptual understandings of the external world by playfully juxtaposing suggestions of the real and the false. These mostly recent films and videos juxtapose alternate personae and imagined landscapes,

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Nov 30

This second program of recent films includes Abraham Ravett’s Horse/Kappa/House, a film inspired by Japanese folk legends which echoes the external and unseen worlds of the Japanese environment; Chana Pollack’s elegiac family portrait Fetal Position, Joell Hallowell and Jacalyn White’s Chapter 20 The Book Club, a vivid record of a group of pioneering women who

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Nov 30

We will begin our New Year with two programs celebrating recent films from the Bay Area and around the country, most of which are premiering or being shown at the Cinematheque for the first time. Tonight’s selection includes Timoleon Wilkins MM, a meditation on his birth and death and that of film; Mark LaPore’s beautiful

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Nov 02

Radical documentary (A Place of Rage, Warrior Marks) and now also fiction filmmaker Pratibha Parmar joins us from London with a selection of some of her earlier groundbreaking works as well as a sneak preview of new pieces-in particular a new short fiction, Wavelengths, a story of lesbian love and cybersex… hot off the editing

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Nov 02

The VIPER Film and Video Festival held in Lucerne, Switzerland, now in its 18th year, is one of Europe’s premier showcases for experimental media. Last October the Bay Area was amazingly well-represented with works by several local artists including Bruce Conner, David Sherman, Vicki Funari, John Turk, Lynn Hershman, and award winner Barbara Klutinis. In

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Nov 02

Tonight’s program pairs two fantasy creations of female exotica, Luther Price’s new tour de force feature A (1996, 70 min., super-8mm, sound) and Josef von Sternberg’s The Scarlet Empress (1934, 109 min.). Luther’s most ambitious film to date (“Roses are red, blood is black”,-L.P.) reveals the fantasies of ‘Edie’, a character unleashed by the obssessions

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Nov 02

Mark Street returns to San Francisco to show Why Live Here? (1996, 50 min.), which explores three characters’ reactions to new environments–San Francisco, Florida and Montana. Each character develops their own particular relationship to place: one moves back to help with a family business, another moves for the cultural climate, and a third moves for

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Nov 02

Tonight we present two rarely screened films that are soaked in the grit, gloom and hope of the 1970s, both set in New York City. First, Life Dances On (1979, 30 min.), Robert Frank’s stunning contemplation of several close friends, including a buddy from the Bowery, his son Pablo and daughter Andrea, and a blind

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Nov 02

Slovenian artist Andrej Zdravic returns to the Bay Area with the premiere of his newest work, Riverglass (1997, video). Originally inspired in the 1960s by his passion for music and for nature, Andrej has created a body of films, videos and installations which “explore spectacles of the planet to rediscover an innocence of the eye

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Nov 02

Caveh Zahedi’s much loved and much reviled independent feature I Don’t Hate Las Vegas Anymore played to sold-out houses at the Film Festival a while back. Tonight we present the inimitable director-actor Caveh in person with both his features, Vegas and the earlier A Little Stiff (co-directed with Greg Watkins; recently sold to the Sundance

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Nov 02

Owen Land (a.k.a. George Landow) returns to the Bay Area for the first time since 1985, and will show a selection of his films made between 1965 and 1980. “The most impressive avant-garde filmmaker of the 1970s was George Landow. Since 1969, when he released Institutional Quality and thereby found a place for his astonishing

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Nov 02

Former super-8mm New York punk artist Beth B continues to work in an astonishing array of media, investing each with a razor-sharp critical edge which dissects social attitudes and psycho-sexual dynamics. Beth’s recent work includes two feature-length films (most recently Visiting Desire with Lydia Lunch), mixed-media installations (Portraits & Playthings, a series of photographs dealing

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Nov 02

Tonight the Cinematheque and FAF invite all moving image makers to bring recent films or videos to the Center for the Arts for a free Open Screening. All submissions will be screened, but should be limited to one per maker and 20 minutes in length. Works will be shown on a first-come basis, so get

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Nov 02

Ernie Gehr will present his newest film, For Daniel (1996, 72 min., color, silent), in its first screening since the Berlin Film Festival premiere in February of this year. Ernie was the subject of a Cinematheque retrospective and monograph in 1993, and received the Adeline Kent Life Achievement award in 1995. “The title implies the

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Nov 02

Belgian filmmaker Chantal Akerman is in town with a new piece about her work at the Film Festival, and we are taking this opportunity to screen one of her recent but not often seen features, Night and Day. One of the most prolific, versatile and provocative women working in film today, Akerman began her career

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Nov 02

Five revolutionary films about family and passion. Pretty Vacant by Jim Mendiola tells the tale of two cultures, a sassy and sabrosa cinema-novela about a punk-rocking Chicana whose guitars, gigs, and zines keep interfering with la familia’s annual pilgrimage to Mexico. One Hundred Eggs a Minute by Anita Chang beautifully explores the struggle between values

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Nov 02

Cinema by its very nature is ephemeral, ending when the theater lights come up. “Phantom Cinema” investigates the mysterious territory between absence and presence, loss and times past. In The Secret Story by Janie Geiser, decaying toy figures, and old illustrations suggest lost narratives which are re-pieced together. Kerry Laitala’s Secure the Shadow uses antique

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Nov 02

Join us for a publication screening/party for George and Mike Kuchar’s newly published Reflections From a Cinematic Cesspool (Zanja Press), “a humorous collection of autobiographical bile, literary lumps, low-budget film-making philosophy and tips…a joint reflection on their flickering universe and the famous and infamous who plop into it from time-to-time.” (GK) Filled with original illustrations

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