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Archive for June 2010 | Monthly archive page

Jun 14

Here’s a chance to see famed but still underground classic (and some recent) avant-garde films, all programs under 75 minutes. • Oct. 8 The End (1953) by Christopher MacLaine; Meshes of The Afternoon (1943) by Maya Deren & Alexander Hammid, Ritual In Transfigured Time (1946), A Study In Choreography for Camera(1945) all by Maya Deren

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Jun 14

Our final program of the calendar mirrors the open structure and wide range of “home screenings”: small gatherings in basements, living rooms, etc. projecting work in an atmosphere of intimacy and risk. Acknowledging the synchronistic wisdom of the camera roll and embracing the amorphous state of the unfinished film, these pieces are like organisms in

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Jun 14

Winner of a 1995 Golden Gate Award, Finnish director Kiti Luostarinen’s Tell Me What You Saw explores the common past of her family—five sisters, a brother and a mother suffering from dementia—only to reveal the instability and partiality of all memory. The siblings have radically different narratives of their shared history, disagreeing on vital questions

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Jun 14

Steve Fagin’s challenging and unorthodox work (The Machine that Killed Bad People, Zero Degrees Latitude) has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and described in the NY Times as “video art at its richest.” Tonight the Cinematheque screens his latest piece Memorial Day (Observed) which was commissioned by KCET public

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Jun 14

James Benning’s Deseret (1995, 80 min.) is a frightening account of the 140 plus-year history of Brigham Young’s creation of the Mormons, the state of Utah, the awesome Church of Latter Day Saints, and his latter-day legacy. Constructed from dozens of New York Times clippings spanning 1853-1995, contrasted with contemplative images of Utah itself, the

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Jun 14

Join Timoleon Wilkins, publisher of the local homespun movie magazine Celluloidall, in its first ever celebration of incredible, projectable film! Selected from submissions by readers from all over the country, the films range from backyard home movies to the poetic, avant-garde and narrative. What these filmmakers have in common is the often painful, considered and

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Jun 14

Janis Crystal Lipzin will highlight her first Cinematheque show in over a decade with the premiere of Seasonal Forces – A Sonoma County Almanac, Parts 1 & 2, which “explores the conjunction of human and natural forces being played out in rural areas everywhere. In 1949 Aldo Leopold posed: ‘We face the question whether a

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Jun 14

These newly reissued works are Warhol’s first experiments in sync sound: Harlot (1964) with Mario Montez, Gerard Malanga and others; improvised dialogue by Ronald Tavel, Billy Name, and Harry Fainlight; music: Swan Lake; and Kitchen (1965) with Edie Sedgwick, Rene Ricard and others; appearances by Ronald Tavel, Andy Warhol and Gerard Malanga; scenario by Robert

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Jun 14

The Cinematheque proudly invites everyone to share this special evening celebrating the work of Bruce Conner, one of America’s master filmmakers and artists, including the premiere of Television Assassination(1995). A pivotal artist of the last four decades, Conner’s work ranges from assemblage, photography, and drawing to a body of films for which he was recognized

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Jun 14

Tonight’s films explore the impact of media representations on how we understand ourselves and the world(s) we inhabit. Exact Fantasy: a film about media correspondence and bringing the stars down to earth (1995) by Laura Poitras (former Programming Assistant and Technical Coordinator at the Cinematheque) is based on fan letters written to different public personalities.

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Jun 14

Nearly a decade after the debut of his incendiary anthology Apocalypse Culture, Adam Parfrey returns to the scene of the crime for another shattering exploration of millennial agony. Cult Rapture fixes its sight on the grotesque, extreme, and little-explored flashpoints of American culture, including the true story of David Koresh and the Branch Dividians, the

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Jun 14

Painter, performance artist, sculptor and photographer Paul McCarthy will premiere the video Painter (1995), recently the centerpiece of an installation at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, and Heidi (1992, co-directed by Mike Kelly). “Paul McCarthy behaves like the quintessential “bad boy”, but his intentions belie that persona. His mischief, poor manners, smelly props, noxious

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Jun 14

Co-presented as part of the 11th Annual Film Arts Festival Dedicated to the Memory of Kevin Deal Organized by Steve Dye Local media alchemists mix, whip, and blow up a wild improvisational evening exploring the relationship between sound and image. From visual artist Lynn Kirby and saxophonist Glenn Spearman’s video and sonic collaboration (Altamont Pass)

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Jun 14

Finally! After two years of near-limbo, Cinematheque is proud to present Jon Moritsugu’s most demented effort Terminal USA. Produced for the Independent Television Service, Terminal USA has only been available in a “self-censored” made for television version. A relentlessly anarchic fever dream of the “model” minority family, the film examines problems facing our troubled teens

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Jun 14

Film Curator at the American Center in Paris and founder of Scratch Projection and Light Cone (Europe’s most active distributor of alternative film), Yann Beauvais visits the Cinematheque with a program of films including: Vivian Ostrovsky’s Uta Makura (Pillow Poems) , on travelling to Japan; Beauvais’ New York Long Distance on the distance between memory

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Jun 14

Co-sponsored by Film Arts Foundation. Noted New York director/curator Jennie Livingston (Paris is Burning) will be on hand to present a collection of little-known short films and videos by gay/lesbian directors whose features have made them prominent in recent years. Though not finalized at press time, the program will likely include a controversial out-of-circulation early

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Jun 14

Co-presented with NAATA and FAF. Renowned writer and filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha gives us a sneak preview of her eagerly awaited first narrative, A Tale of Love, which follows the quest of Kieu, a Vietnamese immigrant woman in love with Love. A free-lance writer, Kieu also works as a model for a photographer who idealizes

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Jun 14

Michael Wallin presents his long awaited new film Black Sheep Boy, a rumination on desire, obsession, and the pursuit of the idealized other. Wallin indulges in his fantasy as he proceeds to deconstruct it. Black Sheep Boy is at once erotic, provocative, playful, disturbing, yet always honest. “Like lyrical segments of Genet’s Un Chant d’Amour,

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Jun 14

San Franciscan Ellen Bruno’s portraits of people from different cultures share a rare blend of astute observation, poetic feel for detail, and passionate involvement with her subjects. Samsara (1990) and Satya (1994) portray peoples of Asia and their shattered lives as refugees. While Samsara uses ancient prophecy, Buddhist teachings, folklore and dreams to understand the

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Jun 14

San Francisco Cinematheque and non productions present …higher animals.

Jun 14

Not only do Cinematheque volunteers and interns give their sweat and blood to keep this organization alive, they also make great films! Tonight’s program features several recent and eclectic shorts by those whose love and labor have been indispensable to us over the past year, including: Judith Pfeifer’s Bodylyrics I, Brian Frye’s 4/95 Untitled, Kerri

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Jun 14

The San Francisco Cinematheque, Film Arts Foundation, and the at SFAI present a rare opportunity to see two early works by acclaimed documentary director Frederick Wiseman. Since his first work Titticut Follies was made and banned in 1967, lawyer-turned-filmmaker Wiseman has made 28 documentaries focusing on American institutions and the societal contradictions they embody. On

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Jun 14

The constant motion of human activity and changing forms creates a visual surface that bends and reshapes itself from moment to moment. San Francisco time and place are expressively revealed through these films. Visions Of A City by Larry Jordan, Last Gasp by Jacalyn L. White, Delugion by Michael Rudnick, Fearful Symmetry by Michael Wallin,

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Jun 14

How does living here affect the brain? These films offer a timeline of fantasies and reveries inspired by the Bay Area as a place of discovery. Four In The Afternoon (1951) by James Broughton, Beat (1958) by Christopher MacLaine, All My Life (1966) by Bruce Baillie, Looking For Mushrooms (1961-67) by Bruce Conner, The Great

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Jun 14

The visual beauty of the Bay Area’s diverse natural landscape ranges from rolling hills to wooded streams, from cliffs to gentle horizons; all are impacted by the region’s singular light and weather. These films reflect on this natural landscape through people’s interactions with it. Span by William Allan and Bruce Nauman, Seasonal Forces: A Sonoma

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Jun 14

The hills and light of San Francisco create a continuous visual adventure in urban space: buildings and streets rove in height and depth as the open sky shifts from spot to spot, and nothing quite stays as it first appears. Panorama by Michael Rudnick, Spring by Thomas Korschil, Same Difference by Al Wong, The Man

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Jun 09

July 5 – 26, Wednesdays, 7:00 PM de Young Museum Special Admission will apply Ticket information: 415/750-3624 or 415/558-8129 A series of film and video programs (in conjunction with the de Young’s exhibition Facing Eden: 100 Years of Landscape Art in the Bay Area) highlighting the diverse ways film and video artists have incorporated characteristics

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Jun 09

One of San Francisco’s most widely shown filmmakers, Warren Sonbert was honored with a complete retrospective at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 1994. The Cinematheque has premiered many of his recent films, but Sonbert’s earliest groundbreaking work has remained unseen in the Bay Area for years. Tonight we celebrate Warren Sonbert’s life and

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Jun 09

This evening’s program presents works concerning fear, conversion experiences, and family values. Time Bomb! and I Want to Meet You, Dear Lady by John Muse and Jeanne C. Finley are works in progress being developed during an artist-in-residency at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center in collaboration with their Work Practice and Technology group. Time Bomb!

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Jun 09

Tonight’s program of new work by Bay Area women filmmakers will be an up-to-the-minute eclectic mix of experimental, animation, documentary and short narrative work all recently out of the lab and onto the screen. Since several of the works are not finished as we go to press, we’re holding off on listing titles. Come and

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Jun 09

In celebration of her receipt of Germany’s ZKM/Seimens International Media Award, the Cinematheque honors local artist Lynn Hershman by screening her recent work, Beautiful People/Beautiful Friends, in which an idyllic scene of love and tranquility transforms into a story of domestic violence and electronic surveillance. Accompanying this will be short pieces by Hershman’s friends and

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Jun 09

Forbidden images from the female libido make up tonight’s show of erotic and funny films from New York and San Francisco. Hima B’s documentary Straight for the Money investigates queer sex workers who strip for men (featuring Joan Nestle, Carol Queen, and Annie Sprinkle), while these shorts are guaranteed to get under your skin: Interior

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Jun 09

Marked by his characteristic concern with time and history, Kluge’s film Der Angriff der Gegenwart auf die Ubrige Zeit (The Blind Director) examines the individual consciousness of historicity and intentionality as mediated by and filtered through mass culture in a series of archetypal parables of life in contemporary Germany. The English title of the film,

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Jun 09

One of the most influential and talented filmmakers of the German New Wave, “Das Neue Kino,” Alexander Kluge’s lyrical, incisive film-essays examine the collective consciousness and socio-political experience of post-war Germany. Informed by the theoretical tradition of Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adorno, Kluge’s work, a sort of formal poetry of the cinema, occupies the undefinable

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Jun 09

Do you remember when your school showed those outrageously funny, embarrassing and terrifying female hygiene and safety educational films? They were made for adolescent GIRLS ONLY and BOYS were NEVER allowed admission! Such sensitive issues as menstruation, personal safety, sex and dating were explored. Tonight’s unforgettable program of these wildly entertaining and shocking 1960s and

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Jun 09

Curated by Irina Leimbacher Camille Billops and James Hatch’s (Finding Christa) newest work examines the causes and consequences of racism in our culture while challenging us to look closely at our own. An eclectic mix of anecdote, interview, and stylized performance, the film “models itself on Dante’s Inferno — a journey through hell where punishment

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Jun 09

Artaud-Mômo, a compelling multimedia performance, takes its title from Antonin Artaud’s celebrated lecture of January 13th, 1947, in which he embodied the spirit of his “Theatre of Cruelty.” Of Artaud, Jean-Louis Barrault said, “he made himself into a theatre — a theatre that did not cheat.” Artaud-Mômo endeavors to invent Barrault’s statement — to bring

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Jun 09

Quick Billy (1967-70) and Camera Rolls (1968-69)

Jun 09

Still Life (1966), Tung (1966), Quixote (1964-1965), Roslyn Romance (Is It Really True?)(1974) and others.

Jun 09

Co-sponsored by S.F.A.I.’s lecture series. “I have just uncovered a term for the way I plan to exist, and continue working: ‘Home Movies.’ Some of us around the country will be creating for a time,perhaps the duration of our lives, home movies. Forced back to the most bare limitations of life and work one can

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Jun 09

Renowned Bay Area filmmakers (Schmeerguntz, Fog Pumas) Gunvor Nelson and Dorothy Wiley return to the Cinematheque to premiere Before Need Redressed (1994) which entirely re-works the material which comprised Before Need (1979). Of the later they said “We started with some dream images, a few actors, friends and relatives. The snow has melted and it

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Jun 09

Ernie Gehr will receive the 1995 Adaline Kent Award for his lifetime body of work. For the occasion, Gehr will present two events: a media installation at the Walter/McBean Gallery (March 30-April 30), Brother, Can You spare Some Time, “a series of reflections and meditations on cinema and changing technologies, as well as the metamorphoses

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Jun 09

Co-sponsored with Center for the Arts. Tonight Cinematheque’s Open Screening moves to the new Media Theater at Center for the Arts. Bring recently completed films (Super 8mm or 16mm) and/or videos (1/2″ or 3/4″) to share and discuss. Only films and tapes 15 minutes or less will be shown; doors open at 7:00pm. Admission is

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Jun 09

Jean Rouch’s Chronicle of a Summer – Paris 1960 (1961, with Edgar Morin) helped launch both cinéma verité and the French New Wave. A seminal figure in ethnographic film, Rouch took his camera to the streets of Paris during a period of political turmoil and the Algerian War to search for truth through interactions with

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Jun 09

Diane Kitchen managed Canyon Cinema during a turbulent period in the late 1970s, and helped guide a stabilize it into its position as a premiere artists’ organization. Kitchen is now on the faculty at University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. She has selected eight films from Canyon’s catalogue–favorites, unknowns and a wild card– which draw their

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Jun 09

A death-defying leap into the joys and terrors of being a teenager in the 1970s, with films made by adults who should know better. First up, a mind-bending selection of “educational” propaganda films made for the high school market, including The Day I Died (drinking, driving, dying), A Quiet Place (David Cassidy has sex, turns

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Jun 09

March 26: SONG 23 (23rd Psalm Branch Part 1 & 2) “The phenomenal and painstaking craftsmanship of this film reflects the intensity of the obsession with which its theme grasped his mind.” (P. Adams Sitney) An epic 85-minute meditation on the nature of war. 8mm prints loaned through the generosity of New York’s Museum of

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Jun 09

March 19: SONGS 15-22, including Fifteen Song Traits (1965, 30 min.), “a series of individual portraits of friends and family.”

Jun 09

Indelible fixtures of the Bay Area film landscape, Thad Povey and Alfonso Alvarez present retrospectives of their work, including Alvarez’ La Reina and Quixote Dreams, and Povey’s I Smell The Blood of an Englishman (premiere). While Povey’s wry use of found footage creates a landscape littered with strangely familiar faces that become silent images in

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Jun 09

Produced by The American Federation of Arts. Yoko Ono was an influential conceptual artist and central figure in the New York fluxus movement of the 1960s. Beginning in 1966, Ono produced 16 films “emerging out of the same complex totality of interdisciplinary endeavors that had informed her objects and performances… In Ono’s films, the camera

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