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Archive for October 2010 | Monthly archive page

Oct 27

Our finale for 2000 includes two new films by old friends which premiered at this Fall’s New York Film Festival. Peter Hutton’s Time and Tide: Study of a River, Part 2 (2000), notable as Hutton’s first extended foray into color, continues this filmmaker’s lifelong study of natural rhythms as encountered and articulated through the dual

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Oct 27

Co-presented by Center for the Arts as part of Teensploitation! Curated by Joel Shepard Tonight marks the first Bay Area appearance of Tracey MacCullion, whose intensely imagined portraits of teenage life have taken New York City and Europe by storm during the past two years. “A relentless, highly-charged punk trance film, Gash depicts the feral,

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Oct 27

Ukrainian Alexander Dovzhenko was part of a group of Soviet filmmakers during the 1920s (also including Kuleshov, Eisenstein, Pudovkin, and Vertov) whose theory and practice radically transformed the language of narrative cinema. Dovzhenko was throughout his life a practicing poet, and his films, whose subjects range from ancient folk myths to post-Revolutionary history, are imbued

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Oct 27

An artful fusion of ethnography and cinema verité, late filmmaker Peter Adair’s (Word Is Out) vibrant first film, The Holy Ghost People, received critical acclaim upon its release in 1967, winning that year’s “New Visions” award in the SF International Film Festival. Adair’s mesmerizing film portrays the mysterious and electrifying presence of the Holy Ghost

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Oct 27

Lyn Hejinian and Leslie Scalapino will read selections from their collaborative poem, Sight. “We agreed that the form of our collaboration was to be in doubles … and that the subject, being sight, should involve things actually seen.” (LS) This book-length work “argues that the moment of coming to see is active and dialogic.” (LH)

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Oct 27

Co-presented by New Nothing Cinema Victor Faccinto will be on hand at the New Nothing to present Body Parts and Fast Reel, two performances from a series he has been developing the past 6 years, which interweave live manipulations of up to 16 simultaneous 16mm film projectors into visually dense experiences. “Unlike painting and sculpture,

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Oct 27

“My on-going project is an investigation into the relationship between imagination and moving image technology. Shadow Land…, a stereoscopic 16mm film, is based on the 1897 autobiography of Elizabeth d’Espérance, a materializing medium who could produce full-body apparitions. It shows how one might think of a medium as a kind of “mental projector” and the

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Oct 27

Tonight’s program includes a wide range of recent films from the Austrian avant-garde, including two in 35mm. Using lost and found footage, home movies, and meticulously photographed images, the works are political, personal and structural. Works screened include: Elke Groen’s rephotographed Tito-Material; Lisl Ponger’s playful critique of travel movies, déjà vu; Kathrin Resetarits’ look at

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Oct 27

The death of artist, writer, and filmmaker Sidney Peterson on April 24 at age 94 marked, in the words of Amos Vogel, “the end of an era.” In little more than three years Peterson helped usher in the vibrant movement of San Francisco avant-garde filmmaking which continues to this day, while also establishing the teaching

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Oct 27

A presentation of the Film Arts Foundation and Bay Area Video Coalition in collaboration with San Francisco Cinematheque and the San Francisco Art Institute Sponsored by the San Francisco Foundation Kenneth Anger, the legendary filmmaker of Fireworks and Scorpio Rising will receive the 2000 James D. Phelan Lifetime Acheivement Award in Film (along with an

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Oct 27

Save the date for the San Francisco Cinematheque Open House, Saturday Nov. 11, 2000, Noon to 5 pm. Come and celebrate with us as we showcase our new office and preview space in picturesque Hunter’s Point Naval Shipyard (Building 116). Potluck Barbecue outside and films in our new preview screening room. Call our new office

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Oct 27

With her widely shown single-channel video, Nest of Tens, featured in this year’s Rotterdam Film Festival and performance work, Love Diamond, recently presented at the Kitchen and New York Video Festival, performance/ video artist Miranda July, makes her first Cinematheque appearance with excerpts from her latest multi-media work, The Swan Tool. Combining performance, live music,

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Oct 27

From mystical desert landscapes to neo-real Korean city scenes, these short poetic works by two San Francisco-based filmmakers create a world of warmth and clarity where vibrant hues contrast with silky pastels in a common exploration of unfamiliar territory. Tonight’s program includes two San Francisco premieres: Coleman’s Hankook Trilogy, an interpretive cine-graph of South Korean

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Oct 27

New York— New Jersey film and video artist Gregg Biermann presents film, video, and real-time music video as performed live by electronic composer Ron Mazurek. “Attempts to reconcile representational and abstract images and structure, Biermann’s films and videos teeter on the friendly chasm betwixt the lyrical and the structural.” (Brian Frye) Conventionally projected works to

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Oct 27

Tonight we welcome the great Swedish-American filmmaker Gunvor Nelson back to SF Cinematheque for the first time since 1995 with her new digital video, Tree–Line, “a minimalistic video, a kind of repetitious stammering with complex variations in rhyme and locomotion.” (G. Nelson) Also included will be screenings of Nelson’s richly evocative and haunting film tapestries

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Oct 27

For more than twenty years, James Benning has been making films of the American landscape which combine elegant formal compositions and structures with subtle political and social critique. His latest, El Valley Centro, presents a portrait of California’s agricultural Central Valley through thirty-five two-and-a-half-minute views, each coupled with synchronous audio tracks but devoid of overt

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Oct 27

Tonight we present three visually stunning and formally audacious films made by women who studied or teach at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Siegel’s The Sleepers hauntingly orchestrates a series of voyeuristic glimpses into the windows of a Chicago night; Lapp and Perlin’s Happy Are the Happy combines anecdotes told by a

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Oct 27

Made possible through the cooperation of the Berkeley Art Museum The late Korean-born Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s body of film, video, and installation has only recently begun to be appreciated. Cha’s delicate and profound installation Exilée (50 min.), which will be presented twice tonight (at 7:30pm and 9:00pm), was featured in CCAC’s Searchlight exhibition last

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Oct 25

Co-Presented by ATA’s Other Cinema With the release of her video Below The New: A Russian Chronicle and film SURFACE NOISE, Abigail Child confirms her position as one of the leading avant-garde filmmakers of this generation. A practicing theorist and poet as well as film- and videomaker, Child has re-defined montage in particularly contemporary terms,

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Oct 25

Applying energetic montage techniques and a strong graphic sensibility to materials freely appropriated from popular culture, San Francisco video artist Rodney Ascher creates playful and perverse pieces in a variety of genres. While flirting with the conventions of commercial production, these works consistently apply an appreciative irony towards their subjects. To be screened: the sock-puppet

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Oct 25

Join SF Cinematheque staff for a kick-off screening/party inaugurating our seventh season of continuous programming at Yerba Buena Gardens Center for the Arts, featuring an exciting array of new non-narrative (i.e. not based on traditional story-telling) film, video, digital projection and performance by mostly local artists. Confirmed titles as of press time include Three Interludes

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Oct 25

This show will not be a bore. It can’t be, it’s atop the roof of the San Francisco Art Institute Lecture Hall. Cinematheque proudly presents its calendar with this film event under the stars. There will be some classics by Robert Nelson, George Kuchar, Rock Ross, Dean Snider, Michael Rudnick and Toney Merritt, some of

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Oct 25

Tonight’s program, part of a two-week celebration of Sound Art throughout the Bay Area, offers a dazzling array of mixed media performances. Dadaists invented “simultaneous poems,” of which one of tonight’s works is a daring and amusing example. Painter Wassily Kandinsky’s Klänge/Sounds uses poetic texts dealing directly and indirectly with sounds of all kinds. Collagist

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Oct 25

“Vincent Grenier is one of the most rigorous filmmakers of the experimental cinema and one of the most ingenious…Since his very first films, Grenier has focused his interest on the simple gestures of the everyday [in order to] draw one’s attention to the minute details which, when filmed, become very poetic and reveal the individual

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Oct 25

In the best tradition of muckraking vérité, Nora Jacobson’s heralded 1992 film Delivered Vacant (Special Jury Award at the 1993 SF International Film Festival) is a richly detailed documentary of urban transition, a Reagan-era gentrification saga with the scope of a 19th century novel. In the early ’80s, the ethnic, blue collar community of Hoboken,

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Oct 25

The Cinematheque hosts an open screening where the public is invited to present recently completed films and videos under 15 minutes in length. Acceptable formats are Super 8 and 16mm film, and 1/2 inch and 3/4 inch video. Works must be submitted to the Cinematheque office by 6 PM Wednesday, March 23rd to be included

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Oct 25

Separated by thirty years, clashing technologies, and a different dope of choice (smack vs. crack), Shirley Clarke’s classic improvisational film The Connection and Ahwesh/Strosser’s pixelvision tape Strange Weather would appear to have little in common other than their fascination with the drug demi-monde. They are, however, uncannily overlapping works, each toying with the audience’s expectations

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Oct 25

New York filmmaker Nina Fonoroff is one of the medium’s most courageous and imaginative investigators of the fragmentation of body and mind. Fonoroff will show Empathy (1980, Super-8, 10 min.), A Knowledge They Cannot Lose (1989, Super-8, 17 min.), and The Accursed Mazurka (1994, 35 min.), about which she writes: “Dramatic recitations, clinical reports, and

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Oct 25

Video artists Deborah Fort and Ann Skinner-Jones will introduce and discuss their recent tape, The Great Divide (1993), a powerful and timely documentary that examines the current debate between the “religious right” and “secular humanists” over the issue of gay and lesbian rights. The tape features spirited interviews with people from both camps who freely

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Oct 25

Tonight’s program celebrates the beauty of cinematic seeing with three masterful films: Chartres Series (1993, 7 min., premiere), Stan Brakhage’s latest hand-painted film, was inspired by the stain-glass windows of the Chartres Cathedral; Nathaniel Dorsky’s Alaya (1976-1987, 28 min.) is a miraculous dance intermingling sand, wind, light and emulsion—”…there is the distinct impression of watching

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Oct 25

For the past ten years, Jack Walsh’s work in film and video has explored issues of class identity and gay sexuality. In Working Class Chronicle (1985) Walsh’s records of personal life collides with evocations of historical events to examine ideologies of the fifties and sixties. Present Tense (1987) defines the filmmaker’s identity through the interplay

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Oct 25

These two early revisionist Westerns by American bad boy Sam Fuller point to what any lover of the genre has long known—that the genre has always invited iconoclasts (Peckinpah, Leone, Ray, Sirk, etc.) who have been delighted to puncture the prototypes it is now fashionable to debunk. I Shot Jesse James focuses on James’ assassin

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Oct 25

Erin Sax (SF) and Ariana Gertsein (Chicago) are two young filmmakers who have made films of exceptional poise and maturity. The films of Erin Sax explore the human body as a vessel for transmitting the frustration and fear of communication, memory and mortality. She will present three recent films —Receiving Sally (1992), Each Evening (1993),

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Oct 25

Jeffrey Skoller will present the world premiere of The Malady of Death (1994), an adaptation of a Marguerite Duras story. “Occasionally, one is so powerfully touched by a work of art that merely to experience it is not enough; one finds that they must actively engage with the work. Marguerite Duras’ story The Malady of

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Oct 25

Mexican-born author, 3-D computer graphics pioneer, radical theoretician, and incendiary filmmaker Manuel DeLanda will present a special program of his rarely seen films followed by a talk on one of his most recent theories. During the early ’80s DeLanda produced a number of extraordinary films conflating subjects like Lacanian theory and film noir (Raw Nerves)

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Oct 25

The world of Kurt Kren is one of paradox, reflecting the extremes that have inflected Viennese art during the 20th century. Uniting a formalist precision with the wit and exuberance of a natural-born hedonist, Kren’s films give the appearance of spontaneity and chance but actually spring from careful observation and contemplation. They are brief (most

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Oct 20

Life on the streets has become a nightmarish survival of the fittest. Tonight’s program includes three different views of how “the other half” is coping with the nasty realities of street life. The program includes Streets (1992, 15 min.) by Curtis Phillips, a portrait of black street gangs in Kansas City: “Our children are mirrors

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Oct 20

Valentine’s Day Eve Festival Video artist and art activist Linda Gibson presents a program of experimental films and tapes by artists of diverse cultural backgrounds who offer intimate glimpses of their experiences with love: falling in love, being in love, and losing love. Works include La Idea Que Habitamos (The Idea We Live In) by

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Oct 20

Farocki’s latest feature-length essay is a sobering and critical account of the Roumanian revolution of December 1989, centered on the 5 days between Ceausescu’s last public speech and the dictator’s execution. “While the events have been reported extensively by every TV station in the world, the makers have managed to find a lot of new

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Oct 20

German filmmaker Harun Farocki is one of the chief heirs to the legacy of the film essay as practiced by Alexander Kluge and Jean-Luc Godard. Since 1967, he has made films that examine socio-political themes from a decidedly subjective point of view, ruminating on topics like napalm production, the Vietnam War, pornography, military reconnaissance, the

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Oct 20

Special Free Admission! A torrid collection of George Kuchar’s newest videotapes, including several of George’s travelogues from spots all over the U.S.: Sunbelt Serenades, Parts 1 & 3, is “a video series on the southwest featuring rocks and empty places plus people wandering around, buying and eating;” Andy’s House of Gary “features 2 Art Institute

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Oct 20

Come help us ring in the new year with a celebration of image-making in the first ever film screening at the Center for the Arts film/video theater! Whether as personal souvenirs of lost moments or as mass-consumed imitations of life, images (family snapshots, films, postcards) give us entry into a world of kaleidescopic sensation inaccessible

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Oct 20

Human beings have gazed at the moon in awe and wonder for millennia. We’ve endowed it with magical powers and created fantastic stories about it, fancying its majestic inscrutability and absolute unattainability. All this changed irrevocably 25 years ago when Neil Armstrong stepped onto the moon’s surface and uttered the most contrived bit of dialogue

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Oct 20

How is silence articulated in an era when plot and action define narrative and time, as content is considered invisible? Out of the corner of the eye, this group of artists question and explore personal experiences of time. This exhibition opens a conversation about other ways of telling stories and describing experience that is related

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Oct 20

A co-presentation with Pacific Film Archive Tribulation 99 (Craig Baldwin, U.S., 1999) • (48 mins, B&W, 16mm, PFA Preservation print) Preceded by: Disaster (Sherry Millner, U.S., 1975–76). (Total running time: 78 mins)

Oct 20

A co-presentation with Pacific Film Archive Short of Breath (Jay Rosenblatt, 1990, 10 mins, Color). Chronicles of a Lying Spirit (by Kelly Gabron) (Cauleen Smith, 1991–, 5 mins, Color). Au Sud (To the South, Sandra Davis, 1991-99, 6.5 mins, From artist). Premonition (Dominic Angerame, 1995, 10 mins, B&W). Lands End (silt, 1995, 11 mins, Color,

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Oct 20

In BAM/PFA galleries (Doors 5 p.m., D.J. 6:30 p.m.) Programmed by Steve Seid and Kathy Geritz Life is a stage, but life with images is a performance. Nao Bustamente has a rep for off-kilter performances that have an edge of spoofy menace. Bustamente’s most recent large-scale undertaking, Silver & Gold, has her cross-dressing as legendary

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Oct 20

San Francisco Cinematheque is excited to announce our CALL FOR ENTRIES for the second-annual Crossroads Moving Image Arts Festival 12- to 15-May-2011 San Francisco Cinematheque seeks submissions of recent films and videos for the second annual festival, CROSSROADS. Occurring in May at the Victoria Theatre in San Francisco, the festival will showcase new works of

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Oct 20

A co-presentation with Pacific Film Archive The Mysterious Barricades (Peter Herwitz, 1987, 8 mins, Silent, Color, Super 8, From artist). Winterwheat (Mark Street, 1989, 8 mins, Color). Sorted Details (Charles Wright, 1980, 13 mins, Color). Vespucciland: The Great and Free (Rock Ross, 1982, 3 mins, Color/B&W, From artist). Field Study # 2 (Gunvor Nelson, 1988,

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Oct 13

Special Time and Admission: Two Shows: 7:00 and 9:15 BIKE BOY (1967-68) Motorcyclist Joe Spencer is the protagonist and object of desire in this roguish sex comedy. Yet another portrait, Bike Boy depicts a young, working-class “bikie” who is decidedly out of his element in the sophisticated world of Warhol and his superstar friends (Viva,

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