Archive for December 2010 | Monthly archive page

Dec 15

One of cinema’s unique qualities is the way that a spatial dimension (length) is transformed into an experiential one (time). Tonight’s films embrace the artificial barrier of the manufactured camera roll, exploring intersections between the physical world and human perception. Morning by Ernie Gehr, Soft Rain by Ken Jacobs, Short Film Series by Guy Sherwin,

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Dec 15

Ulrike Ottinger’s films expose the exotic within the everyday, drawing out the “other” within one’s self as something to be accepted and celebrated. In 1985 Ottinger traveled to China to find “real exoticism” and produced China. The Arts –The People…, a four and a half hour “travelogue” that doesn’t translate or mediate difference but rather

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Dec 15

Our final Open Screening before the year-end Highlights show in May; all formats of film and video shown on a first-come basis.

Dec 15

New approaches to storytelling with tales stemming from a variety of sources, including dreams, comic strips, creation myths, and psychotherapy. Mother by Todd Herman, Crystal Gaze by Bernadette Smith, Automobile Cleanup Expediency by Azian Nurudin, Unaccidental Film by Robert Anbian, Short of Breath by Jay Rosenblatt, Latency by Robert Fox, Rose and Rose Elaine by

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Dec 15

Found footage has never been used so powerfully as when it exposes ideas and cultures of the past. From the Pole to the Equator (1987) by Yervant Gianikian and Angela Ricci Lucchi and Displaced Person (1981) by Daniel Eisenberg each meditate on the chaos of history and the violence of the 20th century–Italy’s colonialism in

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Dec 15

Tony Oursler’s widely celebrated videotapes and installations create a bizarre universe, blending childlike props, miniature sets, fragmented body parts and strange optical effects into discontinuous narratives with ominous political and psychological overtones. Tonight’s overview of his single-channel tapes includes the recent Halloweened, Tunic (Song for Karen), and Kepone Drum. Cinematheque will co-sponsor Oursler’s Installation Dummies

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Dec 15

James Sibley Watson was an early experimental filmmaker (Fall of the House of Usher, 1929) who also developed moving x-ray photography in the 1950s. Barbara Hammer has unearthed and transformed this breathtaking footage into Sanctus (1990), a visual composition with sound by Neil Rolinck. Hammer will also show her video documentary Dr. Watson’s X-Rays and

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Dec 15

Two pretentious fags from New York, Tom Kalin (lyrical filmmaker) and Gregg Bordowitz (didactic videomaker) will present tapes by themselves and others about the AIDS epidemic and have an uproarious cat fight over representational issues such as subjective and objective conditions of struggle, identity politics and collective organization. Bordowitz and Kalin are nationally prominent activists

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Dec 15

Schneemann will present her erotic classic Fuses (1965), Viet Flakes (1965), and Plumb Line (1971); her videotape Carl Ruggles’ Christmas Breakfast( 1966) the installation Exploded T.V. (1990) and video portraits of herself by Victoria Vesna, Maria Beatty, and Anna Korotki. “With issues of censorship, privacy, and sexuality dominating the current art scene, Schneemann’s films are

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Dec 15

Carolee Schneemann, internationally known painter, performance artist, filmmaker and writer treats controversial themes such as sexuality, feminist history and the body as a source of knowledge. Her installation Cycladic Imprints is included in the S. F. Museum of Modern Art’s current exhibit The Projected Image. Using her own work as an experiential base, Schneemann will

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Dec 15

Beth B. began making transgressive super-8 films in the Punk Underground with Scott B, Lydia Lunch and others. She will show her recent videotapes American Nightmare, Belladonna, and the premiere of Thanatopsis (1991). starring Lunch. Greta Snider, one of San Francisco’s exciting young filmmakers, will show Hard Core Home Movie, Blood Story, Futility, and Mute,

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Dec 15

Tonight’s program is drawn from U.S. Latina Strategies, a tour organized by Lourdes Portillo (Las Madres…). “What has been notable in the resurgence of Chicano film and video is the presence of women working in non-traditional directions, trying to get at more subtle issues of identity and subjectivity through non-narrative strategies.” (L.P.) Work by: Berta

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Dec 15

What strange ideas about love are artists exploring today? Tonight’s program gives several clues: This Is What We Do To Dogs by Lewis Klahr, Dream of Passion by Aarin Burch, Jabock by Tom Chomont, Melissa’s Lullaby by Kerry Seter, Drawn & Quartered by Lynne Sachs, Untitled (The Red Film) by John Sabo, The Male Gaze

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Dec 15

Tonight’s panel continues discussions raised in Cinematograph, Vol. 4 on questions of fact, fiction, politics and experiment in contemporary media. Five prominent Bay Area media include: panelists S. Fagin (The Machine That Killed Bad People), L. Kirby (Sharon and the Birds on the Way to the Wedding), L. Portillo (Las Madres: The Mothers of Plaza

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Dec 15

Three works challenging “objectivity” as represented in journalistic and documentary reporting: Bill Stamets’ Novo Dextro follows activities of Chicago’s hate groups and resistance to them; News Diaries, Part 3: Death of the News, by the Buffalo 8mm News Collective, interviews people formerly “covered” by t.v. news stories, allowing them to critique their representation in the

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Dec 15

Celebrating Cinematograph, Volume 4, we begin a series curated by Editor Jeffrey Skoller and Steve Anker, highlighting some works and questions written about in this Volume. Su Friedrich’s Sink or Swim is a haunting portrait of her father, refining previous researches into areas of memory, dream and desire. Anne Robertson’s Apologies is a caustic self-portrait

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Dec 15

The “setting to film” of a composition by Philip Corner, Passage Through: A Ritual (1990, 50 min.) is a major new Brakhage work: “I’d originally made The Riddle of Lumen hoping someone would make an ‘answering’ film and entertain my visual riddle…In some sense I think composer Corner has: and now we have this dance

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Dec 15

Despite the success of the International Tournee and its spin-offs and imitators, a treasure chest of independent animation remains unseen. Tonight’s program samples from this store: the S.F. premiere of Paul Glabicki’s Under the Sea Z (1989), a tour de force inspired by travel and the observation of new places; Sally Cruikshank’s Face Like a

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Dec 15

Lynn Hershman’s Desire Incorporated and Shadow’s Song offer sharply contrasting explorations into the video essay as personal experience, each marked by Hershman’s unyielding intent to directly confront and implicate the viewer. Desire Incorporated (30 min.) is an often hilarious and startling expose of common sexual desire in which anonymous telephone callers are asked to respond

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Dec 15

Admission is free. Once again the Cinematheque puts out a call to film and video makers to share completed or in-progress works with our audience. Highlights from the season’s three Open Screenings will be selected for a regularly scheduled program to be shown in late May. Films and tapes in all formats are welcome, but

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Dec 15

Cinematheque welcomes Linda Tadic with the Bay Area premiere of her new film, Systems of Authority, Methods of Repression (1990, 40 min.). Using her own traumatizing experiences with child abuse as a starting point, Tadic constructs a complex cinematic critique on abuses of power and authoritarian systems in our lives (patriarchal family rule, codes of

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Dec 15

MUSIC is considered to be the purest form of human expression and communication, virtually a universal language. Right On: Poetry on Film (1971), directed by Herbert Danska and produced by Woodie King, features The Last Poets, three young black men (Gylan Kain, David Nelson and Felipe Luciano) who recited their poetry on rooftops with the

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Dec 15

This is the second program of a series established to create a context for an ongoing examination of Bay Area media art. Tonight’s films and videotapes represent the range of approaches and concerns currently being explored. Program includes a 15 minute excerpt from Madeleine’s Variety Television (1990) produced by Madeleine Altmann; Flipper (1990) by Leslie

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Dec 15

“Music, the mother of meaning.” (D.B.) Daniel Barnett returns to the Cinematheque with the world premiere of his first completed film since 1981, Endless (1990, 45 min., b&w, silent at 18 f.p.s.). Barnett is one of independent cinema’s true originals, whose more than twenty films produced between the 1960s and early 1980s (The Steel Chick’n,

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Dec 15

The Man With the Movie Camera (1929, 90 min.), Dziga Vertov’s last silent film, is an extraordinary fusion of social-realist documentary and Soviet formalism. Vertov, through aggressive montage, draws parallels between each individual Soviet’s labor while centering his “kino-eye” on the labor of filmmaking itself, thus fulfilling Lenin’s dictum about film being “the most important

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Dec 15

“One day you will understand the quiet strength of the bamboo.” (The Perfumed Nightmare). Filipino Kidlat Tahimik is an internationally celebrated independent filmmaker (The Perfumed Nightmare, Turumba, etc.) whose work is being given a retrospective at the York Theater earlier this month. Tonight we present the Bay Area premiere of his first videotape, Takedera mon

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Dec 15

A program of “Warholiana,” highlighted by Jonas Mekas’ latest Diary film, Scenes From the Life of Andy Warhol (completed in June 1990; 35 min.). “The film is made up of my film diaries related to Andy Warhol from the years 1965/1982. Locations are New York and Montauk: The Factory, House of George Maciunas, Village Gate,

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Dec 15

Post-war Hollywood produced a stream of darkly introverted melodramas which called into question traditional American values and family life. In these low-budget films by two German expatriot masters of visual narrative, a forbidding presence beneath the surface of life’s ordinary details invades the placid world of small-town inhabitants. Sirk’s All I Desire (1953) features Barbara

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Dec 15

Filmmaker and writer Keith Sanborn has championed the work of the Situationists for years, recently curating a film series for Exit Art in New York City. Tonight we will show La dilectique peut-elle casser des briques (1973, b&w, video, 90 min.) which he has translated and made available in a sub-titled.version “An extra-ordinary example of

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Dec 15

Cinematheque takes the release of Charles Burnett’s acclaimed new film To Sleep With Anger as the occasion to re-screen his first feature film, Killer of Sheep (1976, 75 min.). One of the finest achievements of the recent independent feature movement, Killer… unflinchingly depicts the urban environment of the Watts ghetto in a narrative combining fictionalized

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Dec 15

Tonight’s second Disputed Identities program continues a survey of moving image works by British and American artists of color whose works challenge roles and identities assigned to them by the dominant culture. To quote British photographer David A. Bailey, “A constant repositioning of identities and agendas within a par-ticular cultural terrain is needed…For we are

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Dec 15

San Francisco filmmaker (RocketKitKongoKit, Wild Gunman) and Other Cinema mogul Craig Baldwin will present his new Tribulation 99: Alien Anomalies Under America (1990, 48 min.), “a pseudo pseudo-documentary obsessively organized into 99 paranoid rants, parlaying every imaginable scrap of found-footage, re-filmed TV, and industrial sound into a ‘reconstructed’ eschatological history of post-War intervention in Latin

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Dec 15

In nearly 30 years of working together, Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet have produced an uncompromising body of films too often neglected. In Too Early, Too Late (1981, 100 min.), Straub/Huillet use seemingly simple means to create a portrait of revolutionary struggle. Combining spoken historical texts and documentary-like views of Parisian and Egyptian landscapes, Straub/Huillet

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Dec 15

A program of hallucinatory reveries drawn from familiar material of everyday American life, reconsidered in an absurd and fantastical light. Lewis Klahr’s latest installments from Tales of the Forgotten Future (Five O’Clock World: The Organ Minder’s Gronkey; Hi-Fi Cadets; and Verdant Sonar) further expand his landscape of recombined images and objects, moving at the edges

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Dec 15

A Legend of Parts (1990) by Julie Murray; Love With A Little L (1990) by Jennifer Montgomery; Notes After Long Silence (1989) by Saul Levine; Blood Story (1990) by Greta Snider; Rite of Initiation (1988) by Silvia Gruner.

Dec 15

Through multiple-exposure, juxtaposition, and fracture, the films in this program explore the capacity of the emulsion and the increment of the frame to both collapse linear continuity and construct meaning. The result is a kinetic compression of space that expresses a distinctly cinematic reality. The Melomaniac (1903) by Georges Meliés; Munich-Berlin Wandering (1927) by Oskar

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Dec 13

The films in this program are situated at the delicate intersection of fact and fiction. Employing fictional elements as a means of grounding both subject and viewer, they leave open the question of whether narrative is the inevitable condition of film. Rube and Mandy at Coney Island (1903) by Edwin S. Porter; Eaux D’artifice (1953)

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Dec 13

A Different Kind of Green (1989) by Thad Povey; Weather Diary #6 (1990) by George Kuchar; Vel and the Earthquake by Claire Bain; Fudget’s Budget (1954) a UPA animation by Robert Cannon; Crazy (1987) by Scott Stark Simulated Experience (1990) by Caroline Avery.

Dec 13

On Sunday afternoon during the current calendar Cinematheque will begin two special series as part of an ongoing effort to increase the availability of film and video work to Bay Area audiences. Now in its second year, Another View re-screens film and video works recently shown within Cinematheque’s regular program. By showing works a second

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Dec 13

In this film and video series, Cinematheque is re-screening new or rediscovered works recently shown within its regular program. By offering second screenings, we hope to both widen the audience for these works and allow an opportunity to re-examine them. Admission is free. — ALL SHOWS — 5PM — SUNDAYS — SFAI — MAY 20

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Dec 13

Special time: October 30, 1990 – November 6, 1990 – 4:00 – 9:00 pm daily, admission is free Reception: Friday, Nov. 2, 1990 7:30 pm IT’S NEVER TOO LATE TO BE OUT OF DATE, THE HI-STORY’S CALLED HISTORY, THE TERRAIN IS TALK, HEAVY ON THE SAVVY ‘CAUSE IT’S STICKY, SAYS HELLO LIKE UP YOUR NOSE,

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Dec 13

“Mexico’s history is a litany of atrocities–forced Catholicism, repression, guilt, cultural schizophrenia and an obsession with death that borders on necrophilia. Not surprisingly, when the Mexican movie industry sets out to make a horror movie, the results are so singularly “Mexican” they baffle stateside viewers.” (Jim Morton, Research) Tonight we present three of Mexico’s most

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Dec 13

Mexican artist Silvia Gruner’s work moves fluidly between many mediums–drawing, sculpture, film, video, performance–to explore personal and cultural/historical notions of authenticity critical to our time. Elemental in Gruner’s work is the place of the human body in the material world, as “transmitter and receptor of energy; the body as absorbent material, as motor; the body

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Dec 13

“The relation of photography & language is a principal site of struggle for value & power in contemporary representations of reality; it is the place where images & words find and lose their conscience, their aesthetic & ethical identity.” (W.J.T. Mitchell) Odile & Odette is an ongoing correspondence consisting of letters written to two women

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Dec 13

These two silent films depict illicit underground networks of activity engineered by brilliant sinister minds. Traffic In Souls (1913) is the first important American feature (pre-dating The Birth Of A Nation) and until recently was considered lost. Directed by George Loane Tucker in secret, Traffic… was based on the notorious Rockefeller Committee’s report on white

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Dec 13

Disputed Identities is a survey of media works by multi-cultural artists from Great Britain and the United States presented with San Francisco Camerawork. Emphasizing conceptual, “constructed images”, this exhibition addresses issues confronting those asserting themselves as individuals free from society’s prejudices; especially those who by reason of ethnicity unavoidably assume “disputed identities”. Presented and curated

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Dec 13

The films of Spencer Williams and other Afro-American filmmaking pioneers (such as Oscar Micheaux) were little known outside of the primarily rural communities they were intended for, and consequently many have disappeared over the years. Tonight Adrian Lanier-Seward will present Williams’ Of One Blood (1945) which she reconstructed from materials discovered in the Library of

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Dec 13

“The subject of the self-portrait is encyclopedic, grasping its identity through the optic… of everything that constitutes the individual….Starting from the most personal quest possible, the author opens the self up to the impersonal, moving constantly from the particular to the general, with no other assurance or belief than those of the individual’s own movement….”

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Dec 13

Cinematheque, New American Makers, and the Oakland Museum will present several evenings of video which examine the medium’s relationship to the self-portrait. Curated by Raymond Bellour for the Whitney Museum, this exhibition features American and European artists who fashion their own portraits while rethinking notions of the self-portrait itself. Program I includes: Vito Acconci’s One

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Dec 13

Although Spencer Williams was best known as a character actor (he played Andy of “Amos ‘n’ Andy”), his greatest passion was for the handful of modestly produced folk dramas he directed between 1941 and 1947. Unlike typical “race” movies of the period, Williams achieved a true vision of Afro-American values and concerns by combining traditional

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